Build your tour now

Simply choose the places you will go and the sites you wish to visit. Once completed the tour is automatically compiled and ready for onsite use for your customers.

Would you like existing viewpoints?

Note: Exclusivity is not available for pre-existing viewpoints.

Yes please No thanks

Choose your site


Choose your viewpoint

Tyropoeon Valley

Jerusalem, Israel

You stand in the Tyropoeon Valley in front of the Western Wall. The street is paved and well-constructed. The houses' forms are based on excavations around Jerusalem, however, the exact arrangement of the buildings here is poorly understood.

Add to Tour

Tyropoeon Valley Near Stairs

Jerusalem, Israel

You stand in an open area amongst houses in the Tyropoeon Valley in front of the Western Wall. The houses' forms are based on excavations around Jerusalem, however, the exact arrangement of the buildings here is poorly understood.

Add to Tour

Tyropoeon Valley Under Bridge

Jerusalem, Israel

This is the street in the early 1st cent. AD. The Western Wall towers above you, made with huge blocks topped by half columns. Only the middle section of the Western Wall remains today. The upper and lower sections are reconstructed in this scene.

Add to Tour

Tyropoeon Valley Looking at the Wall

Jerusalem, Israel

Near you is the massive bridge that connected the upper city with the temple complex, called ‘Wilson’s arch’. The other arch you see in the distance, Robsinson’s arch, was another entrance to the temple complex.

Add to Tour

Modern Street Level

Jerusalem, Israel

You are on a 15m column in front of the Temple’s Western Wall. This is the current ground level when you visit the site today. You are surrounded by domestic housing. To your left is Wilson’s Arch and a bridge that gives access to the temple complex.

Add to Tour

On the bridge

Jerusalem, Israel

This is a glimpse into the temple precinct through one of the entrances on the Western Wall atop Wilson’s Arch. You see all of the Western Wall, mostly destroyed today. Stairs draw you to the unknown, to the temple: obscured behind this massive wall.

Add to Tour

Temple - Front Facade

Jerusalem, Israel

The famed Second Temple on the Mount, reconstructed under the reign of Herod, is known to us through depictions on coins, and ancient historians who report elaborate decorations in marble, copper, and gold.

Add to Tour

Temple - Inner Court Close to the Basilica

Jerusalem, Israel

The grand, extensive surrounding portico of the Temple Mount delimited the sacred precinct, where only members of the Jewish nation were allowed to enter, and only on religious business. Herod had the area extensively refurbished, elaborating the existing structures.

Add to Tour

Phasael Tower 1

Jerusalem, Israel

King Herod had three great towers constructed to guard over his royal palace and city and the city of Jerusalem below. These were named after his brother (Phasael), trusted general (Hippicus), and favourite wife (Mariamne).

Add to Tour

Phasael Tower 2

Jerusalem, Israel

Looking down the strong walls defending the Upper City of Jerusalem, from here you can admire the decorative design of the reconstructed Tower, restored here with a shining dome, which must have been visible from far outside the city walls when it reflected the bright rays of the sun.

Add to Tour

Herodian Pool

Jerusalem, Israel

The splendour of Herod’s Palace has been the subject of much debate, but what is clear is its opulence. The ancient historian Josephus, who lived just after the time of Herod, spoke of the magnificence of the grand halls, water features, and coloured marbles imported from across the Roman world.

Add to Tour

Herod’s Palace Building

Jerusalem, Israel

The ancient historian Josephus wrote of lavishly decorated interiors, walls bedecked with imported coloured marbles, and ceiling traced with gold. Using parallels from across the Roman world, here can be seen how this may have looked two thousand years ago.

Add to Tour

Herodian Tower (Mariamne)

Jerusalem, Israel

Herod’s great towers were built to not only protect the city and his own palace, but as a place of final refuge should the need ever be great enough. When Jerusalem was razed by the Romans in 70 AD, these towers were among the few points left standing.

Add to Tour

Western Cardo (Inside the Portico)

Jerusalem, Israel

The Western Cardo became the most important thoroughfare of Byzantine Jerusalem. During the Roman period this part of the city, remained partially not inhabited and probably occupied by the X Legio Fretensis.

Add to Tour

Western Cardo (Within the street)

Jerusalem, Israel

Jerusalem changed and grew in the Byzantine period. As the Temple Mount lost its importance, this was reflected in the orientation of the city. Along the Western Cardo two important Christian structure were built: the Church of Holy Sepulchre and the Nea Church.

Add to Tour

Herodian Quarter Palatial Mansion

Jerusalem, Israel

The richly decorated Residential Hall of the Palatial Mansion is located to the south-west of the Temple Mount. Given its opulence and location, the structure had highly decorative elements and contained rich goods fit for the high-social status of the owners and their guests.

Add to Tour

Overall View of the Temple Mount

Jerusalem, Israel

From the southernmost bridge entering the Temple Mount, the vast walls stretching out towards the Antonia fortress far off to the north can be admired. Below the bridge lies the sprawling lower city. Inside the monumental entryway was the mighty Royal Stoa, built as part of Herod’s restoration of the Second Temple.

Add to Tour

Robinson’s Arch viewed from the South

Jerusalem, Israel

A monumental staircase provided direct access to the Temple Mount from Jerusalem’s lower area. This staircase, constructed by Herod the Great, is unusual in both its scale and the broad span of its supporting arch. It is named after the biblical archaeologist, Edward Robinson, who rediscovered its remains.

Add to Tour

Northern Palace - Upper Terrace

Masada, Israel

Standing in the upper terrace of the northern palace places you within Herod’s personal quarters. Few received the privilege of witnessing this grand view and it was from here that Herod would contemplate the course of his kingdom.

Add to Tour

Northern Palace - Middle Terrace

Masada, Israel

The middle terrace, defined by the circular tholos, was Herod’s audience hall where the “King of the Jews” would address emissaries. The mountains in the distance were the battlefields where Herod defeated Antigonus and claimed his throne.

Add to Tour

Northern Palace - Lower Terrace

Masada, Israel

You are now at the lower terrace of the northern palace where visitors would be greeted and leisurely activities were pursued. The desolate lands seen through the windows serve as a reminder of the toil that preceded the splendour.

Add to Tour

The Lots and the Ostraca Sherds

Masada, Israel

Cornered by the Romans, the Zealots took refuge in Masada. Fiercely opposed to Roman rule, the Zealots were desperate as can be seen in the sherds (ostraca) engraved with names of those who took the lives of their companions before taking their own.

Add to Tour

Large Bath House - Courtyard

Masada, Israel

This courtyard served as the palaestra, an open space where boxers and wrestlers would practice their craft, for the bath house. A typical component of a bath, the palaestra was an important part of Greco-Roman education.

Add to Tour

Large Bath House - Apodyterium

Masada, Israel

The apodyterium, or “undressing room”, served as the entrance for the baths. Patrons would generally leave their garments with servants so as to not be stolen before engaging in exercise, taking a bath, or socialising with other citizens.

Add to Tour

Storerooms Complex - Herodian

Masada, Israel

This storeroom, part of a larger complex, was a crucial component of Masada that housed weapons and a food supply that could last years. It was here that Herod stored some of the luxurious benefits of kingship, like Augustus’ favored Setinum wine.

Add to Tour

Synagogue

Masada, Israel

Initially constructed as the stables of the Herodian period, this structure was transformed into an early place of worship during the Zealot occupation of Masada. While the little synagogue may seem humble when compared with the opulent religious buildings of the time, such installations were central to the Jews’ decision to take up arms against the foreign Roman forces.

Add to Tour

Western Palace - Zealot Ovens

Masada, Israel

An ad-hoc Zealot installation during their occupation of Masada, these tabun ovens in the Western Palace were necessary for the Zealot’s survival against the Romans. This scene gives one a view into the domestic aspects of the ancient world.

Add to Tour

Storerooms Complex - Zealot Period

Masada, Israel

The storerooms were crucial to Masada’s effectiveness as a fortress and during the revolts the Zealots used these halls to make their stand against the Romans. Out of desperation the Zealots also used these storerooms as living quarters.

Add to Tour

Synagogue - Inner Room

Masada, Israel

The Holy-of-Holies was a private space reserved only for the most devout. The small space in the ad-hoc was reserved for the baking of holy bread for worships and the disposal of holy texts. As sacred scrolls degraded and were no longer fit for use, they were buried within the temple itself as befit the word of God.

Add to Tour

Large Bath House - Apodyterium (Zealots)

Masada, Israel

Back at the apodyterium but this time we can see the changes made to the room since the Zealot occupation of the fortress. Notice the pool that was added in the corner of the room, likely out of necessity as the rebellion raged on.

Add to Tour

Dionysus House - Mona Lisa

Sepphoris, Israel

Inside the Dionysus House is the so called Mona Lisa room, where a beautiful mosaic exemplifies the cultural diversity of the mansion. Reclining on the tricliniums, the audience will find themselves surrounded by lutes, lyres, and luxury.

Add to Tour

Crusader Fortress

Sepphoris, Israel

The Battle of the Horns of Hattin (4th July 1187) was the key battle that led to the Christian loss of Jerusalem and prompted the Third Crusade. The Crusaders, after many days encamped in the upper part of Sepphoris, descended towards their destiny.

Add to Tour

Theatre - Orchestra

Sepphoris, Israel

Romans carried their culture with them to all the lands which they colonised. While theatre begun as a Greek pursuit it was readily adopted by the Romans, and as they spread so did their distinctive theatre structures.

Add to Tour

Theatre - Cavea

Sepphoris, Israel

In the ancient world, as today, entertainment had an important role in binding people together. The theatres of the Roman empire were a space for rare, shared experiences with plays making their way from from the centre of the empire, out into the provinces.

Add to Tour

In the Arena

Arènes de Lutèce, Paris, France

Today the amphitheatre is a park. This view of the seating area and stage gives tremendously insightful indication of scale. There were 35 rows of benches built against a slope that contained curved vaulted corridors that gave access to seating.

Add to Tour

On The Seats

Arènes de Lutèce, Paris, France

Elite spectators sat here, shielded from the harsh sun by shades (velarium). From this point, one was close enough to contemplate the deathly struggle taking place below. This area had its own entrance, separated from the lower status seating behind.

Add to Tour

Looking Out

Arènes de Lutèce, Paris, France

The amphitheatre was a rare mix of gladiatorial arena and theatre—a multi-function building. The exact design of the stage building is uncertain but may have featured a decorative façade similar to contemporary Roman theatres, and statues (now lost).

Add to Tour

Archway

Arènes de Lutèce, Paris, France

The structure was built between the 1st & 2nd centuries AD after Roman conquest. You stand at the entrance (aditus maximus) looking at the arena, which was probably covered with sand to soak up blood. The arena (52 x 45m) was cut 2m into the earth.

Add to Tour

Near the Tholos

Athenian Agora, Greece

The dining hall of the Athenian council, located at the junction connecting Athens’ major public sites. Councilmen would sleep here nightly, so that the Athenian citizens could always find their civic ministers.

Add to Tour

Middle Stoa

Athenian Agora, Greece

A grand covered walkway, second in scale and magnificence in Athens only to the Stoa of Attalos. Here people could walk in comfort, rest from the heat of the sun, or trade wares. A testament to Athens’ investment in everyday public life.

Add to Tour

Behind the Agora

Athenian Agora, Greece

Take in the spectacle of the public grounds from the perspective of the local residents themselves. Compare the splendour of the public works with humble private residences.

Add to Tour

In front of the Odeion of Agrippa.

Athenian Agora, Greece

Stand in awe before the spectacular Odeon of Agrippa, a monument to Roman philhellenism. Painted giants, sea gods, and philosophers greet you at the entrance to the grand orchestral theatre.

Add to Tour

Vestibulum of Odeion of Agrippa

Athenian Agora, Greece

Make your way inside the Odeion, and see the red walls, multi-coloured marbles, and painted statues. This first glimpse of the theatre interior greeted Athenians to a display of admiration from the Romans who so revered Greek culture.

Add to Tour

Top of cavea

Athenian Agora, Greece

Enter into the world of the stage, where music and rhetoric was performed before an audience. Overseeing the performances are figures known once to the Athenians; now forgotten and re-imagined.

Add to Tour

Front Row Seats

Athenian Agora, Greece

Enjoy the spectacle of the stage, from the best seats in the house. Get up close to the stage, and consider the kind of performances you might have seen from here - music, rhetoric, or poetry recitation.

Add to Tour

In Orchestra

Athenian Agora, Greece

Stand in the orchestra, where the chorus would stand during theatrical performance. Below your feet the chorus stamped, danced and sang their way through the famous works of Greek theatre.

Add to Tour

On the Stage

Athenian Agora, Greece

Look out at the audience, see the theatre from the privileged perspective of the actors and performers. Feel their nerves and triumph before your audience.

Add to Tour

Top Seats by the Door

Athenian Agora, Greece

From here you can have a full view of the statues encircling the theatre, and enjoy the bright and varied colours of statue painting, a neglected art of the ancient world, underappreciated in modern popular consideration.

Add to Tour

Left of Stage

Athenian Agora, Greece

Take your first step to the stage from the wings, and enjoy a full view over the stage, the seats, the painted and decorated walls and high vaulted ceiling of the Odeon.

Add to Tour

In Front of the Seated Philosophers

Athenian Agora, Greece

Before you stands Epicurus and the Seven Sages of Greece, the great pre-socratic philosophers, early statesmen and lawgivers of the Greek world: Cleobulus of Lindos, Solon of Athens, Chilon of Sparta, Bias of Priene, Thales of Miletus, Pittacus of Mytilene, and Periander of Corinth.

Add to Tour

In Front of the Eponymous Heroes

Athenian Agora, Greece

The Eponymous Heroes represent heroes of the 10 tribes of Athens: Hippothoon, Antiochos, Ajax, Leos, Erechtheus, Aigeus, Oineus, Akamas, Kekrops, and Pandion. Over time, heroes were added or removed for political concerns: here we depict the 13 that stood in the 2nd century CE.

Add to Tour

On the Panathenaic Way

Athenian Agora, Greece

The Panathenaic Way was the road travelled by the procession of the Great Panathenaia and Great Dionysia festivals. The stoae of the Agora were constructed along it, to offer shelter to those who wished to view the procession, and became important spaces of Athenian social life.

Add to Tour

Entrance

Acropolis, Greece

You have entered the Acropolis precinct, just having made the journey up the monumental stairs on the west of the fortified hill. Behind you is the Propylaia, while to your left and right are statues dedicated to Athena and the triumphs of the city.

Add to Tour

Courtyard of the Erechtheum

Acropolis, Greece

You now move to inside the western courtyard of the Erechtheum. Underneath the portico, you can see the fine details of the Ionic columns. The giant olive tree, sprouted from Athena’s spear, provides a focal point to this area.

Add to Tour

North of the Erechtheum

Acropolis, Greece

Outside the Erechtheum, you now witness the full scale of this uniquely designed building. The impressive Ionic order on the northern facade is framed by the ornate door and rich colour palette. Behind you is the north fortification wall, constructed from the ruins of the old buildings destroyed during the Persian attack.

Add to Tour

East of the Erechtheum

Acropolis, Greece

You move around to the east side of the Erechtheum. From this viewpoint the east facade of the Erechtheum is on full display, with a richly decorated Ionic order painted in vivid blue and red. If you turn around you will see the Great Altar, with its monumental steps and the Sanctuary of Zeus Polieus.

Add to Tour

East of the Parthenon

Acropolis, Greece

We now arrive to the main attraction: the Parthenon. You are standing on the eastern side of the temple dedicated to Athena. Observe the pediment depicting the birth of Athena and the metopes that describe the battle between the Olympian Gods and the Giants. To your right, is the Sanctuary of Zeus Polieus, while directly behind is the Sanctuary of Pandion.

Add to Tour

North of the Parthenon

Acropolis, Greece

Moving around the Parthenon, you are now positioned on the northern side. The richly coloured metopes describe the Greeks battling the Trojans. Take note of the columns, a marvel of ancient architecture that slightly swell in the centre. Behind you can see the remains of the old Parthenon, destroyed in the Persian attack.

Add to Tour

West of the Parthenon

Acropolis, Greece

Arriving at the western end of the Parthenon, this view is most familiar with visitors today. The pediment describes Athena’s struggle with Poseidon, while the the metopes underneath depict the invasion of Athens by the Amazons (also known as the Amazonomachy).

Add to Tour

Courtyard of the Chalkotheke

Acropolis, Greece

The final viewpoint on the Acropolis Hill takes you to the courtyard of the Chalkotheke. Take a final view at the buildings and monuments that surround you. The statue of Athena Promachos also peaks above the landscape, a beacon for those viewing this sacred landscape from miles away.

Add to Tour

Stoa of Eumenes entrance

Acropolis, Greece

We are on the south slope of the Acropolis, inside the Stoa of Eumenes. This sheltered area protected those walking between the Theatre of Dionysus and Odeon of Herodes Atticus. This second floor was accessed via an external staircase at the end of the building.

Add to Tour

Stoa of Eumenes centre

Acropolis, Greece

We are in the centre of the stoa. Notice the wooden roof ceiling and the floor. Also take note of the columns running down the centre, a style typical of stoas. Contemplate the landscape in the distance.

Add to Tour

Areopagus Hill

Acropolis, Greece

The Acropolis is now in the distance as you stand next to the Areopagus Hill. In the Archaic period, the Areopagus Hill served as a meeting place for the Areopagite Council. Look around at the Athenian landscape and gaze and the monuments on the Acropolis.

Add to Tour

Base of the Propylaea

Acropolis, Greece

The grand Propylaea, the only known work attributed to the architect Mnesicles, was the splendid entrance to the Athenian Acropolis. It served as one end of the Sacred Way, leading down to the sacred and mysterious caves of Eleusis.

Add to Tour

Entering the Parthenon

Acropolis, Greece

The complex nature of this building has long fascinated historians: the Parthenon was at once a sacred monument to the patron deity of Athens, a treasury vault for the riches Athens extracted from her allies, and a monument proclaiming the supremacy of Hellenic culture.

Add to Tour

Before the Statue of Athena

Acropolis, Greece

The statue of Athena won great acclaim in the ancient world, and was considered among the finest work of the master sculptor Phidias. Her ivory skin, and garments of plated gold, were a striking sight which gave the work both splendour and delicacy.

Add to Tour

Beside the Statue of Athena

Acropolis, Greece

From here the towering scale of the statue is best observed. The materials would have cost a tremendous sum. From the 5th century CE she is lost from the records, emerging in Constantinople in the 10th century, before disappearing entirely from the sight of history.

Add to Tour

Upper Level of the Parthenon

Acropolis, Greece

The unusual colonnade of the Parthenon interior had two orders, and scholars have speculated that a second level stood between them, associated with a stairway in the eastern wall. From here the Nike can be admired, standing near 2 meters tall on the hand of Athena.

Add to Tour

Athena Promachos

Acropolis, Greece

Standing above the statue of Athena of Promachos, viewers can survey the impressive bronze monument to the goddess of Athens. Statues of Athena, Theseus, Pericles, and the spoils of the Persian War can be seen from up on high.

Add to Tour

The Caryatids of the Erechtheion

Acropolis, Greece

Looking upon the ruins of The Old Temple of Athena Polias, which housed the ancient olive-wood statue of Athena, from here you can examine the famous Caryatid statues, restored to their original colour scheme. This unusual space may have enshrined the tomb of Kekrops, mythical king of Athens, and marked the end of the Procession of the Panathenaia.

Add to Tour

Interior of the Temple of Apollo

Delphi, Greece

The home of the Pythia: priestesses who channeled the god Apollo to foretell the future of inquisitive Greeks. The source of the visions and utterances of these prophetic priestesses has fascinated ancient and modern thinkers alike.

Add to Tour

From the Theatre

Delphi, Greece

Theatre had a religious component in the Greek world, and was often performed during important religious festivals as an offering to Dionysus. Here we have reconstructed the theatre in its Hellenistic phase, when it received a permanently constructed stage.

Add to Tour

In front of the Temple of Apollo

Delphi, Greece

Here you stand before the grand Temple of Apollo, surrounded by the magnificent bronze monuments dedicated by the Greeks, in supplication or gratitude for prophecy from the god.

Add to Tour

Siphnian Treasury

Delphi, Greece

The superbly decorated Siphnian Treasury displayed the magnificent wealth of the city state of Siphnos, which had grown rich from silver and gold mines - and wanted all the emissaries visiting Delphi to know it.

Add to Tour

Beside the Colossus

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

Gaze at the immense bronze Colossus statue, representing the Sun God. This statue was moved to make room for the Temple of Venus and Rome, which dominates the piazza. The god leans on a pillar and guides Rome’s fortunes with a rudder, held in the right hand.

Add to Tour

West Entrance to the Colosseum

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

You are now standing in front of the Colosseum’s western entrance. Above you are statues depicting the gods and heroes of imperial Rome, bronze shields capping the top. The floor is paved with marble and boarded with cippi to assist with crowd control.

Add to Tour

Western Colosseum Piazza

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

Moving to the southeast corner of the Temple of Venus and Rome, you now have a better view of the glistening Meta Sudans fountain. Behind are houses, and in the distance is the Temple of the Divine Claudia and the Aqua Claudia.

Add to Tour

Via dei Verbiti

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

See the gleaming Colossus of Nero - now the Colossus of Sol, retitled to separate the monument from the bitter memory of Nero’s infamous exploits. Behind is the Flavian Amphitheatre, known better as the Colosseum for its association with the striking bronze colossus, placed in the piazza after the area was remodelled to reflect Rome’s commitment to public works.

Add to Tour

Nero’s Stagnum

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The focal point of the ‘Golden House’ of the emperor Nero, this magnificent artificial lake existed only to host the emperor’s private party-boat. The excesses of Nero have become infamous, and were seen as such even during the emperor’s own lifetime. This site is perhaps the most telling monument of the memory of Nero left to posterity.

Add to Tour

Flavian Amphitheatre

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

Following the death of Nero, the empire fell into turmoil, with Vespasian emerging the victorious new emperor. The extravagant private buildings of Nero were seen as a mark of shame, and were torn down. In the place of Nero’s massive private lake, a public theatre was constructed on an unprecedented scale, sending a clear political message in support of expenditure in the interest of the public.

Add to Tour

Colosseum, Ground Floor

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The Colosseum may be considered the greatest arena constructed prior to the modern era, though it was built almost 2,000 years ago. It’s grandeur was remembered in the Middle Ages, where people saw it with an air of mystery. The site was in the 17th century considered one of Christian martyrdom, and in 1720 stations of the cross were installed.

Add to Tour

Colosseum, Upper Level

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The seating of the Colosseum was thoroughly hierarchical, with the upper levels of seating reserved for lower classes. The emperor was provided a special box, as were the Vestal Virgins, while senators were provided spaces to bring their own comfortable chairs. The importance of the Colosseum extended beyond simply sport - it displayed a cross section of Roman society.

Add to Tour

Arch of Constantine

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

From here the many complex decorative panels of the Arch of Constantine can be best admired. The scenes in relief commemorate Constantine’s accession to the throne, depicting Victoria, captured shields, enslaved barbarians, and a frieze detailing Constantine’s triumphant speech to the people of Rome from the forum.

Add to Tour

Piazza Colosseum

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

From here the grandeur of the Colosseum is striking, and the amphitheatre can be contextualized by a smaller monument visible down the road - the Ludus Magnus, where the gladiators destined for the arena lived and trained. An underground tunnel connected the Ludus to rooms below the Colosseum, so the gladiators could move without interacting with crowds.

Add to Tour

Colosseum Underground

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

Behind the scenes of the greatest marvel of the Roman Empire. See the inner workings of the amphitheatre which gave rise to the ancient world’s greatest spectacles.

Add to Tour

Metro Terrace

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

From up here you stand among the many insulae that made up the living quarters and shops of the Roman people, and look out to the piazza of the Colosseum. Massive crowds of an estimated 73,000 would gather for the extravagant displays performed here, and shop owners no doubt made a bustling trade from their business - as indeed they do today!

Add to Tour

Colosseum marble seats

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

This position permits an excellent overview of the splendid structures along the piazza. The Temple of Venus and Rome, the Colosseum, the Temple of Divine Augustus, and the Arch of Septimius Severus can all be seen - great monuments to four of Rome’s great emperors: Hadrian, Vespasian, Augustus, and Septimius Severus.

Add to Tour

By the Arch of Constantine

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The Arch of Constantine is an intricate work that has intrigued historians for generations - many believe its decorative panels are recycled from pre-existing monuments from across Rome. Perhaps appropriately, the Numidian Yellow columns that once decorated the arch were themselves reused in the later periods of Rome’s history.

Add to Tour

South of the Arch of Constantine

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The Via Sacra was the processional route marched during a triumph, and it traced a path passing the great monuments of Rome. The Colossus of Sol, originally of Nero, must have been a striking feature along the route, and with his arch Constantine framed it expertly - perhaps associating himself inextricably with Rome’s past and Sol himself.

Add to Tour

In the Middle of the Arena

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The Colosseum was the site of some of the most elaborate and sensational spectacles the ancient world had ever known. It’s towering cavea hosted a massive crowd, who may wait in line overnight to ensure good seats - the performances were grand, and their cost exuberant.

Add to Tour

Between the Arch and the Colosseum

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

As one of Rome’s most popular social spaces, the Colosseum Piazza was the place for emperors to leave grand public monuments for display. From this viewpoint you can see the greatest of them, including the now long buried Temple of Claudius on it’s grand terrace.

Add to Tour

Beside the Colossus (4th Century)

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

Here you stand beside the Colossus whose name the area is now known by. Notice the allegorical figures in the amphitheater to the left and the Arch of Constantine in the distance, truly a testament to the splendour of Rome.

Add to Tour

Colosseum Underground Upper Level

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

This viewpoint places you on the upper level of the underground chambers, where the machines that controlled movable panels in the floor of the arena were operated, to enable the sudden release of beasts, weapons, or stage props.

Add to Tour

Colosseum Underground Beasts

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

These chambers caged the exotic beasts that were imported from the furthest reaches of the empire to be displayed and battled in the arena of the Colosseum. Beast hunts and damnatio ad bestias - execution by ferocious animals - were well attested spectacles of the empire.

Add to Tour

Western Colosseum Piazza (3rd Century)

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

See the famed monuments of the Colosseum piazza as you stand before the four-horse chariot monumental entrance of the world’s greatest amphitheatre.

Add to Tour

Nero’s Stagnum (Dusk)

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The focal point of the ‘Golden House’ of the emperor Nero, this magnificent artificial lake existed only to host the emperor’s private party-boat. The excesses of Nero have become infamous, and were seen as such even during the emperor’s own lifetime. This site is perhaps the most telling monument of the memory of Nero left to posterity.

Add to Tour

Colosseum, upper level (Dusk)

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The seating of the Colosseum was thoroughly hierarchical, with the upper levels of seating reserved for lower classes. The emperor was provided a special box, as were the Vestal Virgins, while senators were provided spaces to bring their own comfortable chairs. The importance of the Colosseum extended beyond simply sport - it displayed a cross section of Roman society.

Add to Tour

Colosseum, ground floor

Colosseum Piazza, Italy

The Colosseum may be considered the greatest arena constructed prior to the modern era, though it was built almost 2,000 years ago. It’s grandeur was remembered in the Middle Ages, where people saw it with an air of mystery. The site was in the 17th century considered one of Christian martyrdom, and in 1720 stations of the cross were installed.

Add to Tour

Temple of the Vestal Virgins

The Roman Forum, Italy

The tholos temple of the Vestal Virgins was the enshrined hearth of Rome, where burned the sacred fire of Vesta that maintained the eternal life of the Roman Empire. The Vestal Virgins tended to the flame as their life’s work, and ritually commemorated the ashes to the Tiber River once a year. The design of the Temple is modelled on a simple round hut, but elaborately decorated - representing Rome’s humble past and later magnificence.

Add to Tour

Temple of Julius Caesar

The Roman Forum, Italy

The Temple of Divine Caesar was constructed under the rule of Augustus, who honoured his adoptive father with apotheosis. The Roman historian Suetonius reported that four months after the assassination of Caesar, a comet burned brightly for seven consecutive days, and was revered as the soul of Caesar entering heaven. For this reason, the temple of Caesar is decorated with a comet star in the pediment.

Add to Tour

Regia

The Roman Forum, Italy

One of the oldest buildings of the Forum, this site is believed to have original served as a royal residence for the early kings of Rome. After the rise of the Republic over the monarchy, the Regia was repurposed as the office of the Pontifex Maximus, the head religious figure of Rome. Here sacred texts were housed, and the shrines of Mars and Ops, Sabine goddess of fertility were maintained.

Add to Tour

Temple of Romulus

The Roman Forum, Italy

This temple was dedicated to Romulus, son of Maxentius, who died young. The temple is excellently preserved, even maintaining its original bronze door, as it was reused as a church through the medieval period and protected. The building is identified by a Maxentian coin depicting the building and inscribed Aeternae Memoriae.

Add to Tour

Basilica of Maxentius

The Roman Forum, Italy

The Basilica of Maxentius is the grandest construction of Maxentius’ fervent building program following a fire that destroyed many buildings on the west of the forum. After Maxentius’ death, Constantine rededicated the basilica to himself, even resculpting the colossal statue within to match his own appearance. The huge standing structures left today are a testament to the ingenuity of Roman engineering.

Add to Tour

Temple of Venus and Rome Platform

The Roman Forum, Italy

Located on the platform of the Temple of Venus and Rome, you can see the grandeur of the Colosseum. Take note of the houses in the distance that surrounded this area and the large shadow cast from the tremendous temple.

Add to Tour

Temple of Venus and Rome Portico

The Roman Forum, Italy

You are surrounded by a forest of columns that stretch to a vaulted ceiling. Look up and see the colossal size of these columns, now in storage, or destroyed. Glimpse through the columns at the shimmering Colossus.

Add to Tour

Temple of Venus and Rome Entrance

The Roman Forum, Italy

You finally make it to the entrance of the temple. A bronze door leading to the inner section of the temple is seen to your right. Light reflected from the Colosseum sprays across the marble floor.

Add to Tour

Basilica Paulli

The Roman Forum, Italy

The Basilica Paulli was constructed under the patronage of Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, brother of the triumvir Marcus Lepidus, and bribed supporter of Julius Caesar. Along the attic were colossal statues of Parthian prisoners, the heavily damaged remains of which are today stored for preservation. Late in the empire, the Basilica was home to the shops of silversmiths.

Add to Tour

In front of the Basilica Julia

The Roman Forum, Italy

This building has ties with many of the great names of Roman history. The building was inaugurated while still incomplete in 46 BC under the patronage of Caesar, who would be assassinated before he saw its completion. After a fire, the basilica was restored by Augustus. This site hosted the courts of law that Pliny the Elder officiated early in his career, and it was reported by Suetonius that Caligula, declaring that “a man ought either to be frugal or Caesar”, threw money down from the upper stories into the forum crowds for days on end.

Add to Tour

Temple of Concord interior

The Roman Forum, Italy

Enter into the temple of the goddess Concordia and notice the opulence in the glinting marble and golden statues. Look down the length of the cella and admire the statues of Latona and her Twins, Diana and Apollo, and see the elephants carved in black obsidian. This magnificent temple acted as a museum for some of the finest art works in Rome.

Add to Tour

Temple of Julius Caesar altar

The Roman Forum, Italy

The cult of Divine Caesar emerged among the plebs soon after his death, with pilgrims travelling to mourn or worship at the site of his cremation in the forum square. In response to popular will, or possibly to enlarge his own standing, Augustus constructed the Temple of Divine Caesar, providing a sanctified space for worship. The altar in front would have gifts left before it, and flowers are still left by some at the remains today.

Add to Tour

Vestals and Arch of the Parthians

The Roman Forum, Italy

Here can be seen monuments to two faces of Roman culture: the ancient religious order of the Vestal Virgins, keepers of the fire of Vesta; and the Triumphal Arch of the Parthians, a monument to the glory of Roman conquest, and expansion of its eastern territories.

Add to Tour

Basilica of Maxentius Interior West

The Roman Forum, Italy

The long hall of the Basilica of Maxentius creates a tremendous sense of space and grandeur. This cavernous hall would have served many uses, from public gatherings to trials to administration - but it seems its primary purpose was to ‘wow’ the people of Rome.

Add to Tour

West of Basilica Aemilia

The Roman Forum, Italy

Take in the Roman Forum at its most magnificent. Arrayed around you are the key civic and religious structures of Rome; as well many monuments attesting to the might of its empire.

Add to Tour

Trajan’s Forum

The Roman Forum, Italy

The massive Forum of the Emperor Trajan celebrated in grand style the emperor’s successful reconquest and suppression of Dacia. The loot from the Dacian campaign was used to fund propaganda celebrating its own suppression, with coloured marble statues of the captured Dacian prisoners lining the central court, adorned with a glorious statue of the triumphant emperor.

Add to Tour

Forum from Via Della Curia

The Roman Forum, Italy

This viewpoint places you on top of the roof of the shrine dedicated to the Tiber river, for a rare view over the forum. Here you can see how closely connected the fora of Rome were by the late imperial period. The Forum Romanum stands before you, and behind are the imperial fora, built with the wealth of empire.

Add to Tour

The Basilica Ulpia

The Roman Forum, Italy

These splendid judicial halls served as a junction connecting the wide open space of the forum square to the more cloistered courtyard around Trajan’s column. In this highly decorative hall were apses housing statutory, and officials undertaking judicial and administrative tasks.

Add to Tour

Stadium Domitiani

Campus Martius, Italy

Drawing from and elaborating upon a traditionally Greek form, Domitian’s Stadium was Rome’s first permanent venue for competitive athletic competition. The structure has left a subtle but lasting mark on the city of Rome, with the stands forming the foundations of the modern Piazza Navona.

Add to Tour

Templum divi Hadriani

Campus Martius, Italy

Constructed by the emperor Antoninus Pius to honour his adoptive father, the Hadrianeum may stand alongside the the great achievements of his predecessor. While much of the temple structure remains today, integrated into the Piazza di Pietra, its fine surrounding portico of fine yellow giallo antico marble has been all but lost.

Add to Tour

In the stands of the Stadium Domitiani

Campus Martius, Italy

The stands of Domitian’s Stadium place the viewer at the very heart of the entertainment precinct of Rome. From the stands above the imperial box one may see not only Rome’s first athletic track, but also the Odeon music hall, Pompey’s Theatre and the Antonine Baths.

Add to Tour

Northeast Podium

Cordoba, Spain

The Temple of Cordoba is an outstanding example of imperial Roman temple Corinthian architecture, and was stunningly placed overlooking the circus of Cordoba. This must have been a truly magnificent view, which can be seen again through virtual reconstruction.

Add to Tour

Southeast Podium

Cordoba, Spain

The Corinthian order of architecture was favoured by the Romans for the striking display of ornate details, with swirling leaves, unfurling scrolls, and blossoming flowers rendered from the marble with remarkable liveliness. Standing in the portico of the Temple of Cordoba, these features can be admired from up close.

Add to Tour

In front of the temple

Cordoba, Spain

You stand between the Temple of Cordoba and the Roman altar, where sacrifices were offered to the gods. Billows of smoke reaching to the sky from before the temple must have presented a spectacle for those in the stands of the circus below.

Add to Tour

View of the northeast courtyard

Cordoba, Spain

Spectacle, sport, and religion were complexly intertwined in Roman culture, with games sponsored by the empire in celebration of religious festivities. In Cordoba, the temple overlooking the circus - the most popular sporting site - served as a constant reminder of this connection.

Add to Tour

Circus Maximus Exterior

Cordoba, Spain

The chariot races of the circus were the most popular shows of the Roman empire, and the presence of a circus in a Roman city was an expensive addition that demonstrates the significance and large population of Roman Cordoba.

Add to Tour

Roman Bridge Gate

Cordoba, Spain

Inside the gate of Cordoba was the a small porticoed plaza, welcoming visitors to the city as they passed through the monumental gate, where shopkeepers may have flaunted their wares to travellers from afar, perhaps arriving via the Guadalquivir River.

Add to Tour

On the Roman Bridge

Cordoba, Spain

The bridge of Cordoba retains its Roman structure, but has been altered over the millennia from its original design. Bridge building was a specialty of the engineers of the Roman empire, and Cordoba is an excellent example.

Add to Tour

Outside Amphitheatre

Cordoba, Spain

Cordoba was renowned across the empire for the excellence of its gladiators, and this mighty arena was where their skill and tenacity were put to the test. This arena was one of the largest outside of Rome - in fact, it may be the third largest of the Empire.

Add to Tour

Roman Theatre of Cordoba

Cordoba, Spain

The main monuments of Roman cities are all present at Cordoba - a circus, an amphitheatre, a temple, and a theatre. The recently excavated theatre is among the best preserved monuments from the city. Here you can see where the inhabitants of Cordoba came to engage with the literary and theatrical culture of Rome.

Add to Tour

Circus interior

Cordoba, Spain

The monuments stretching down the spina of the arena are similar to those found in the Circus Maximus of Rome, with the metae at either end signalling the turn, and a central tower connecting the strip. Water filled the strip, which must have glistend brightly in the sun.

Add to Tour

Temple of Augustus (Roman Period)

Barcelona, Spain

The forum - a large public square - stood at the centre of urban life in Roman Barcelona. The space combined the essential organs of civic government with the Roman state religion. Looming over the space was the elaborate temple to Rome’s first emperor and the final pacifier of Iberia, Caesar Augustus.

Add to Tour

Roman Fullonica (Roman Period)

Barcelona, Spain

One’s status in Roman society was signified by the clothes that they wore. For those allowed to wear the toga, its cleanliness and whiteness was a priority. A fullonica was a Roman laundry, important for not only cleaning the clothes of Roman citizens but maintaining their very reputations.

Add to Tour

Roman Wall and Moncada Aqueduct (Roman Period)

Barcelona, Spain

As an important hub of trade, Roman “Barcino” was protected by impressive city walls and watered by the Moncada aqueduct. This impressive feat of engineering carried water from over 10 km away into the very heart of the city.

Add to Tour

Episcopal Complex (7th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

Following the arrival of the Visigoths, the bishops of Barcelona would become both the champions and representatives of the city’s Latin population. Constructed using the ruins of preceding Roman monuments, seat of the Bishops was to become as much a fortress as a religious centre.

Add to Tour

Royal Shipyards (13th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona functioned as the main port and naval base for the Catalan Crown of Aragon. The naval might of the expansionary crusader kingdom was so important that the area north of the city was dedicated solely to the maintenance of the royal fleet in the 13th century, with Royal Shipyards being constructed on the city’s margin in the 14th century.

Add to Tour

Old Port (16th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

By the 16th century, the Barcelona skyline was transformed. As the key centre of trade for the wealthy Crown of Aragon, Barcelona was embellished with elaborate Gothic architecture. The approach to Barcelona by ship allows the viewer to take in this dramatic view of the city.

Add to Tour

Parc de la Ciutadella Entrance (18th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

The mighty star shaped bastion fort called the Ciutadella dominated the north of 18th century Barcelona, and was abhorred as a monumental symbol of Barcelona’s oppression under the rule of the Bourbon dynasty. Above the grand imposing walls of the fort can be seen another symbol of Barcelona’s oppression: the Tower of Saint Juan, which served as the citadel prison.

Add to Tour

Universal Exhibition (1888)

Barcelona, Spain

The main complex of Barcelona’s Universal Exhibition was centred on the electrical ‘magic fountain’ beside you, which displayed stunning shows of coloured lights and dancing streams of water in the night. The old buildings from the heart of the Ciutadella remained, and a grand new Palace of Industry was constructed to display exhibits from creators and salesmen from Barcelona and across the world.

Add to Tour

International Hotel (1888)

Barcelona, Spain

The splendid Gran Hotel Internacional was hastily built to sleep esteemed visitors to Barcelona from across the globe, and was a bold statement of Barcelona’s place amongst the elite cities of the world. The power lines which run the street were constructed to connect the Hotel to Barcelona’s new electrical lighting, developed for the exhibition, announcing Barcelona’s place in modernity. The Hotel, built quickly on unstable ground, would be demolished within 10 years.

Add to Tour

Roman Tinctoria (Roman Period)

Barcelona, Spain

The Tinctoria was where fabrics were dyed - an important business, as the colour of one’s clothes was an important signifier of rank or role in Roman society. Clothes were carefully dipped with tongs into large vats of dye, made with the use of imported plants and minerals, all of which is reconstructed before you.

Add to Tour

Parc de la Ciutadella Interior (18th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

The destruction of the Ciutadella was not a complete annihilation. Most essential was the removal of the fortress walls, which were an unequivocal symbol of military domination. The buildings themselves were reappropriated for greater purpose, now serving as the seat of parliament, and a high school.

Add to Tour

Portico of the Roman Forum (Roman Period)

Barcelona, Spain

You are standing in a portico with a magnificent view of the imperial Roman temple. Porticos around forums were generally occupied by different shops (tabernae) where visitors would spend much of their day buying and selling goods. The portico itself allowed to take shelter from the elements: the rain and from the hot Iberian sun in summer.

Add to Tour

Old Port (close) (16th Century)

Barcelona, Spain

By the 16th century, the Barcelona skyline was transformed. As the key centre of trade for the wealthy Crown of Aragon, Barcelona was embellished with elaborate Gothic architecture. The approach to Barcelona by ship allows the viewer to take in this dramatic view of the city.

Add to Tour

Acera de la Marina, 1850

Malaga, Spain

The shoreline of Malaga changed substantially over the centuries, but never more substailly than in the 19th century, when the city walls were demolished and the shoreline transformed into an array of splendid apartments facing onto the seafront.

Add to Tour

Alcazaba to the Port, 1200

Malaga, Spain

You stand upon a tower of the inner citadel of the Alcazaba. Created by newly arrived Arab and Berber soldiers following the Islamic conquest of Spain, the imposing Alcazaba dominates the city and port of Malaga. Not just a crude garrison, the Alcazaba was truly a seat worthy of the new rulers of southern Spain.

Add to Tour

Alameda, 1850

Malaga, Spain

The Genoa fountain of Malaga was the major sculptural work of the Alameda, which was lined with busts on marble pillars. Either side of the Alameda are charming houses, a testament to the prosperity of Malaga.

Add to Tour

Atarazanas, 1720

Malaga, Spain

Before you stands the Atarazanas, a naval workshop and arsenal that protected and serviced the ships of Malaga. Beside the Atarazanas is the Castillo de San Lorenzo, a fortress built to defend the port from ongoing raids by pirates.

Add to Tour

Alameda, 1720

Malaga, Spain

Here you stand on one of the many trading ships that passed through this renowned port, carrying wares from as far west as Peru, or as far east as Indonesia. Here you can see the strong walls that defended this wealthy port city from marauding pirates.

Add to Tour

Alcazaba, 1200

Malaga, Spain

Passing the lower citadel walls as you leave port, it becomes clear why the Alcazaba was the site of one of the longest sieges of the Spanish Reconquista.

Add to Tour

Roman Forum West (Flavian)

Valencia, Spain

You stand within the western portico of the Roman forum of Valentia during the Flavian period (1st century AD). Around you are the most important buildings making up one of the most impressive complex for the Roman Imperial citizens and visitors of the city. The basilica, the temple and the forum portico represented the social and administrative focus of Roman Valentia.

Add to Tour

Roman Forum (Flavian)

Valencia, Spain

You are standing in front of the Roman Temple that occupied the central space of the forum of Valentia. The overview of the basilica, the Curia and the aedes Augusti of the city (civic and administrative buildings) sheds light on how the administrative centre of a Roman provincial city looked.

Add to Tour

Circus (Roman period)

Valencia, Spain

You now stand within the Roman Circus of Valentia, one of the most important venues for entertainment for the city during the Roman period. Horse races were appreciated all over the Empire, and Valentia’s building hosted numerous citizens who would come to spend part of their day enjoying the ludi.

Add to Tour

Circus (Visigothic)

Valencia, Spain

The eastern side of the Roman circus became part of the new fortification wall of Visigothic Valencia around the 6th century AD. Inside the old Roman structure, the Visigoths built numerous houses re-using the architectural elements of the previous building for new walls and so populated an additional area of the city.

Add to Tour

7th century Baptistery

Valencia, Spain

The baptistery was among important structures to the Christian community of Valencia in the 7th century. Inside the building (that was part of the Episcopal complex together with the Visigothic Cathedral and the Mausoleum of St. Vincent) you will appreciate the decorative elements such as the mosaic floors, the columns, the throne for the priests and the baptismal font placed in the exact centre of the cruciform building that has almost disappeared today (apart from a few elements from the original perimeter walls).

Add to Tour

Visigothic Episcopal Complex

Valencia, Spain

The Episcopal complex of Valencia was composed of three main buildings: the central Cathedral, the Baptistery and the St. Vincent Mausoleum. The veneration of the martyr, St. Vincent, prompted the development of the area as funerary centre inside the city. Some tombs were built not only around the martyrdom but also further north within the ancient location of the Roman forum that was partially adapted to this new sacred function.

Add to Tour

13th century Cathedral of Valencia

Valencia, Spain

The Cathedral of Valencia, properly called the Cathedral Church Metropolitan Basilica of Santa Maria of Valencia, is one of the best examples that follow the series of technical and aesthetic developments which took place in the kingdom of Valencia from the 13th to the 16th century. The 13th century cathedral was a combination of the new Valencian Gothic architecture and a more traditional one. The decorative elements refer to a clear archaism.

Add to Tour

Serranos Towers in the 16th century

Valencia, Spain

These are the Serranos Towers as they were during the 16th century. During the night of 1586, the Prison of the House of Charity suffered a terrible fire that forced its relocation. The municipal treasury decided to use the Serranos Towers as a prison to host nobles and prisoners from the upper social classes. Between the end of the 16th century and the end of the 18th century, the prison began to be occupied by people of different social status.

Add to Tour

Original River

Valencia, Spain

Standing on top of the Royal Bridge, you can see the original waters of the Rio Turia, the river which originally flowed around Valencia. The 1957 flood moved the municipality to alter the river’s course and to transform its riverbed into a public garden. The impressive waters of the river will put you back into the Medieval period of the city.

Add to Tour

Torres de Quart

Valencia, Spain

The Torres de Quart was the main entrance from the Kingdom of Castile with whom Valencia developed an increasingly active trade relationship during the 14th century. In 1626, the building hosted a women’s prison, and during the War of Independence in 1808, French troops bombed the structure. It continued to be a prison until 1931, after which point, it hosted the City Council. In the 1980s, several restoration activities were directed by Emilio Rieta. The reconstruction allows you to see not only the building, but also the western countryside of the city with its rural landscape.

Add to Tour

Roman Forum North

Valencia, Spain

You stand along the northern side of the Roman forum of Valentia. Here, you can see the forum’s Temple, with its decorative and architectural elements. Close to the visitors are the forum portico elements, such as the peculiar columns, and further away you can see the Roman basilica’s roof and the side doors of the Aedes Augusti.

Add to Tour

Circus South (Roman)

Valencia, Spain

You stand within the southernmost area of the Roman circus of Valentia. The decorative elements of the arena, such as the columns, are visible close to the visitors. Furthermore the seats and the openings will allow the visitors to be back into the Roman social life of the Spanish city.

Add to Tour

Circus South (Visigothic)

Valencia, Spain

The Visigothic houses situated within the circus were built after a substantial fire took hold within the city walls. Later, the floor levels were newly raised and the area of the circus started to be constructed upon. The houses were built with plinths made of spolia, earth, and small stones, together with walls made up of stone masonry. The pavements were composed of lime mortar. Along the southern half of the circus some architectural elements and silos suggest production activity occurred within the area between the mid-6th and the beginning of the 7th century AD.

Add to Tour

Circus Central (Roman)

Valencia, Spain

You stand within the central area of the Roman circus of Valentia. The decorative elements of the arena, such as the columns, are visible close to the visitors, as well as the small gardens which may have been cultivated around these small dwellings.

Add to Tour

Circus Central (Visigothic)

Valencia, Spain

The central area of the Roman circus of Valencia was densely built up and inhabited from the 6th century AD. Not only can you see the new residential buildings (within which you can see reused Roman decorative elements) but also other ruined elements of the Roman circus, for example the seats that were already destroyed when the walls of the original arena were already ruined and dismantled.

Add to Tour

Theatre

Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Located on the southern slopes of the rocky Three Hills, the theatre is semi-circle in shape, with an outer diameter of 82m. The decoration behind the stage was made of pink marble, and evidence suggested that gladiatorial spectacles were performed.

Add to Tour

East Gate

Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Originally built in the 2nd century AD to commemorate Hadrian’s visit, the ruins of the East Gate can be seen at Tsar Ivan Shishman Street. The street was 13.2 m wide and featured a colonnade on both sides, decorated in the Corinthian order.

Add to Tour

Forum

Plovdiv, Bulgaria

This commercial precinct had a distinct rectangular shape, and represents the second phase of the forum, 1st century AD - 3rd century AD. It was also the location of public administration buildings.

Add to Tour

Outside the City Gate

Pula, Croatia

The Arch of the Sergii, known also as the Golden Gate, announced the presence of a grand Roman city, aweing visitors. The Roman Imperial Eagle inside the arch reminded all who entered that they were under Roman purview.

Add to Tour

Inside the City Gate

Pula, Croatia

Inside the ancient walls, you can see the everyday lives of the citizens of Pula. Sophisticated Roman architecture was used in construction of ‘insulae’ apartment buildings, made lively with bold stripes of red paint.

Add to Tour

Centre of the Forum

Pula, Croatia

The forum was the home of civic life for citizens in the Roman empire. It served as a social meeting space, market, political soapbox, circulation hub, and religious site all in one.

Add to Tour

Under the Portico

Pula, Croatia

The elaborately adorned entrance to the central religious monument of Pula - possibly Croatia’s finest Roman sacred site. A fascinating insight into the Roman Imperial cult of divine emperor worship - the Roman propaganda machine.

Add to Tour

South-West Gate of the Amphitheatre

Pula, Croatia

Stand between the mighty amphitheatre and the sea. Spectacle and athleticism was greatly admired in Roman society, and Pula’s lucrative oversea trade in oil and wine funded the construction of a place to host it.

Add to Tour

In the Centre of the Amphitheatre

Pula, Croatia

Gladiatorial combat, hunting spectacles, damnatio ad bestias, and martyrdom, all was witnessed here before 23,000 enthralled spectators.

Add to Tour

Underground

Pula, Croatia

Staging the spectacles of the amphitheatre required sophisticated engineering conducted underground - from here, beasts, props, and warriors could be raised, seeming to emerge from the depths of the earth.

Add to Tour

Roman Theatre: Interior

Pula, Croatia

Here you stand on the orchestra floor, where the chorus of the ancient theatre acted, danced, and sang as an integral part of ancient tragedy. The floors of ancient theatres were often paved in coloured stones, creating a captivating display.

Add to Tour

Small Theatre - From the Stage

Pula, Croatia

Stand on the stage of an ancient Roman theatre, at the base of the monumental stage front that decorated grand Roman theatres. Before you is the aulaeum, the theatre curtain, which was raised from the ground to cover the stage between scenes.

Add to Tour

Overlooking the Theatre

Pula, Croatia

Stand at the back seats of the stage - usually reserved for the cheaper tickets, this position gives a sweeping overview of the theatre, with its marbled floor, decorative stage, and imperial statuary.

Add to Tour

Amphitheatre walkways

Pula, Croatia

The Roman amphitheatre was a marvellous feat of ancient engineering: a towering mountain of concrete and stone rising out of the flattened cityscape. Standing atop the upper walkway of the amphitheatre, one may appreciate both the imposing size of the structure and the ease with which patrons moved throughout it.

Add to Tour

Amphitheatre from above

Pula, Croatia

Patrons of the amphitheatre were spared the direct heat of the Mediterranean sun by an awning, or velarium, which would have once stretched across the seating of the amphitheatre. The precise means by which these extendable shades were operated remains a mystery.

Add to Tour

Door out to the Sea

Vizula, Croatia

The splendidly polished bronze doors of the residence open out onto a celebrate seaside horizon, surveyed from a row of elaborately decorated marble columns.

Add to Tour

Corbitas in the Bay

Vizula, Croatia

Corbitas were the most popular of the trading vessels of the Roman Empire, their deep hulls filled with wine, oil, crafts, and metals from as far as England or the Persian gulf.

Add to Tour

Ancient Tesserae

Vizula, Croatia

One of Vizula’s most striking features is the tremendous artistry delicately showcased in exceptionally well preserved in floor mosaics. Here you can see one restored completely in the imperial bath.

Add to Tour

Zlatna Vrata

Split, Croatia

Here you stand before the main entrance to the palatial complex of Spalatum, half retirement villa and half military garrison. This massive gateway was the most highly decorated of the complex, and once enclosed an iron portcullis gate.

Add to Tour

Golden Gate (inside city)

Split, Croatia

Here you stand just inside the complex along the main road leading from the Golden Gate to the entrance of Diocletian’s palace. The long colonnaded street, known as the cardo, is a spectacular greeting to the complex.

Add to Tour

Crossroad

Split, Croatia

Here you stand at the intersection of the complex. To the north are the Spalatum apartments, believed to have served as military barracks. To the south is the imperial complex, which contained the Temple of Jupiter, the the imperial residences, and the mausoleum of Diocletian.

Add to Tour

Triclinium

Split, Croatia

A Triclinium was a Roman feasting hall, where well-to-do guests would enjoy wine and conversation while reclining on three couches surrounding a central table, laden with fine foods. This space is elaborately decorated, and was likely intended for the private guests of the imperial family.

Add to Tour

Srebrena Vrata (Silver Gate)

Split, Croatia

The eastern gate to the complex, known as the Silver Gate, followed the decorative style of the Golden Gate, but to a less extravagant degree.

Add to Tour

Zeljezna Vrata (Iron Gate)

Split, Croatia

Here you stand before the western gate, known as the Iron Gate of Split. Inside runs the Decamanus Maximus, the main east-west street of the complex.

Add to Tour

Peristyle

Split, Croatia

Here you stand between the Temple of Jupiter, whom Diocletian revered as his patron god, and the Mausoleum of Diocletian, where the emperor’s body was buried and preserved.

Add to Tour

Vestibulum

Split, Croatia

This viewpoint places you inside the Vestibule, the entrance hall to the imperial residences. While the structure is still standing today, it is only a shell of its former glory, believed to have once been lavishly decorated with coloured marbles and tiles.

Add to Tour

Temple of Jupiter

Split, Croatia

Diocletian revered Jupiter as his divine father, and built this beautifully decorated temple in his honour. Respected through the ages for its beauty, the temple has been adapted for many purposes over time. Here you can see the original restored.

Add to Tour

Triclinium Sea View

Split, Croatia

Wealthy Romans loved to place their villas near water features, often lakes of rivers, and especially the sea. The gentle coastal waters once extended right to the southern extremity of the palatial complex of Spalatum, where Diocletian could look out peacefully to the Adriatic Sea.

Add to Tour

By the model

Split, Croatia

Here you stand on a Roman boat at the walls of the palace, where the long decorative arcades allowed the calming breeze of the sea to cool the palace. The central entrance was perhaps the port for esteemed visitors arrive by boat.

Add to Tour

The Great Bath, north face

Bath, Great Britain

The Great Bath was the central hub of the Roman settlement of Bath. Indeed, many historians believe that the settlement of Bath was never intended as a place of residence, but was in fact an expansive religious complex where the sacred waters provided mystical healing. Remnants of this connection may be recognized today in the curious similarity between the architecture of Roman baths and later Christian basilicas.

Add to Tour

The Great Bath, east face

Bath, Great Britain

The original spring that provided naturally heated mineral water, revered for its believed curative properties, was channeled to the Great Bath via a sluice at the top of the spring, removing sediment and allowing bathers to enjoy clean and clear water. The main supply of water to the bath was from the north west corner, where excavations revealed a platform probably meant for a statue. The Romans often associated rivers with gods, and so here we have placed a typical Roman river-god statue, lazily watching over the healing waters.

Add to Tour

The Great Bath, west face

Bath, Great Britain

Roman occupation of Britain was characterized by extensive building projects - once this region was subdued, the Roman intended to stay, and occupied bath for almost 400 years. In that time, the complex underwent a series of renovations and extensions, which must have come at great expense. The floors of the bath were lined in lead sheets to protect the stone from gradual erosion over hundreds of years.

Add to Tour

Sacred Spring, right window

Bath, Great Britain

The waters of the sacred spring were holy, believed to have mystical restorative properties. Beside these magic waters we have restored two pouring pans excavated from the remains of the site, believed to have been integral to some ancient Roman water ritual.

Add to Tour

The Temple of the Seasons

Bath, Great Britain

From this viewpoint the altar and statue of Sulis Minerva can be best admired. Although the original statue placed here has long been lost, our reconstruction uses the pose and dress of depictions of Minerva excavated in England and housed in the British Museum, paired with the hairstyle from a statue excavated from on site.

Add to Tour

Overview of the complex

Bath, Great Britain

The sacred complex of Aquae Sulis was an carefully arranged elaborate assemblage of structures, positioned such that the triumphal arch, altar, statue, and temple were all in alignment, with the facade of the temple facing the rising sun. Intersecting this line as another alignment of the Temple of the Seasons, statue of Sulis Minerva, quadrifrons arch, and central window of the Sacred Spring. The entire complex was encircled by a portico for visitors.

Add to Tour

Phase 1, Public Access

Stonehenge, Great Britain

Within the great earthwork chalk embankment were found an array of holes known as the Aubrey Holes, the function of which has been long debated, but was are believed to have served as post-holes for the first stonework monuments of Stonehenge.

Add to Tour

Phase 2, Public Access

Stonehenge, Great Britain

The stones of the first phase were removed from their holes, repositioned into a central display. New stones placed squarely at four corners within the embankment were placed, known today as the Station Stones, two of which can still be seen today.

Add to Tour

Phase 3, Public Access

Stonehenge, Great Britain

Though the stones take pride of place, Stonehenge at its heart is a landscape project, and the embankments defined the site. In this final phase, their importance was remembered, and new embankments were constructed around the north and south Station Stones.

Add to Tour

In Progress, Public Access

Stonehenge, Great Britain

These early works of engineering allowed the movement of hundreds of tonnes of stone from kilometers afar, and their carefully placement and arrangement with remarkable geometric accuracy.

Add to Tour

Solstice line from the Heel-Stone

Stonehenge, Great Britain

The Heelstone is one of the more enigmatic features of Stonehenge. It is the only one of the megalithic stones to remain unworked, keeping it’s natural form. Yet the stone clearly held some importance, for it was surrounded with a ditch of its own in the later construction phases of Stonehenge.

Add to Tour

Phase 3 Public North

Stonehenge, Great Britain

The carefully arranged ‘station stones’ positioned squarely around the centre ring of massive stones can here be seen - two provided with a mound and ditch, two without. A gap in the surrounding embankment can be noted, perhaps a separate entryway to the monument.

Add to Tour

Phase 3 Public West

Stonehenge, Great Britain

This viewpoint positions the viewer outside the confines of the monument, where the chalk embankment is emphasised over the central stones. This is the view that would have confronted a prehistoric visitor.

Add to Tour

Phase 3 Public South-West

Stonehenge, Great Britain

The landscape held great significance to prehistoric peoples, and Stonehenge may be interpreted as a means of interacting with that landscape. The long avenue stretching to the horizon led down to the River Avon, where the smaller ‘Bluestonehenge’ was recently discovered, potentially connecting Stonehenge to metaphysically to the river itself.

Add to Tour

Phase 3 Public South-East

Stonehenge, Great Britain

The avenue was a massive earthwork embankment leading up to Stonehenge, stretching half a kilometer into the distance. These works were completed approximately a thousand years after the first works on the site.

Add to Tour

Maison Carrée and Forum

Maison Carrée, Nîmes, France

The Heritage listed Maison Carrée, admired for centuries as a striking example of Roman architecture, was once the centre point of an extensive and elaborately decorated forum. The elegant temple square was a gathering point for festivities and socializing, encircling and augmenting the beauty of the temple.

Add to Tour

Palaestra at Olympia

Olympia, Greece

The Palaestra was the training grounds for athletes preparing for the games. Here, wrestling and boxing could be practiced under the guidance of trainers, who would watch from the shade of the portico, correcting the form of their students.

Add to Tour

Temple of Zeus (exterior)

Olympia, Greece

The Temple of Zeus is one of the greatest works of classical Greece, considered to be the standard of Doric architecture. The statues dedicated before the temple and in the pediments were exceptional works of great sculptors of the world, most notably the famed sculptor Phidia, whose workshop was located in Olympia.

Add to Tour

Temple of Zeus (interior)

Olympia, Greece

The Temple of Zeus never changed it’s form, which was considered a perfect representation of Doric architecture, but was embellished over time by cultures wishing to pay respect and leave their mark on the famed sacred site. The floor before the temple was paved in alabaster and coloured marble by the Romans, announcing patronage - but also control - of the sacred space.

Add to Tour

Temple of Hera

Olympia, Greece

The Temple of Hera marks the place where the modern olympic torch is lit, and represents one of the earliest stone temples on Greece. From this viewpoint can also be seen the Metroon, the temple of the mother-goddess; the Philippeon, a shrine to the cult of Alexander the Great; the Ash altars of Olympia; and the splendid Nymphaeum, a Roman statement of pride and philhellenism.

Add to Tour

Leonidaion

Olympia, Greece

The Leonidaion was the finest hostel of Olympia, housing distinguished visitors to the games. The elegant Ionic colonnade was the work of the sculptor Leonidas, for whom the building is named, and whose statue stood before it.

Add to Tour

The Stadium

Olympia, Greece

The foot races of Olympia were believed to be the oldest Olympic event, founded by Herakles himself. A Greek ‘stadion’ was a standardized length, which came to be a unit of measurement equivalent to 600 Greek feet. Clearly the footrace held great importance to the Greeks, that it should became a standard by which they measured the world itself.

Add to Tour

Inside the Temple of Zeus

Olympia, Greece

The interior of the Temple of Zeus is dominated by the colossal chryselephantine masterwork, the Statue of Olympian Zeus, a wonder of the ancient world shaped by the hand of Phidias. Above, the open ceiling of the temple and fine pentelic marble roofing glow in the sun, illuminating the space with heavenly white light.

Add to Tour

Temple of Poseidon North

Sounion, Greece

You stand between the stoa and the temple, perhaps having just entered into the sanctuary from the decorative propylaea entryway. The stoa, a colonnaded shelter, provided respite from the hot sun and salty winds, while separating the sacred temple space from the outside world.

Add to Tour

Temple of Poseidon East

Sounion, Greece

This viewpoint places the viewer strikingly between the classic Doric architecture of Poseidon’s Temple and the rocky cliffs the tower from the ocean. Poseidon was the god of both the ocean and earthquakes, and the connection of jagged rocks and swirling seas may have evoked this dual role to worshippers at the site.

Add to Tour

Temple of Poseidon South

Sounion, Greece

The meticulously organised architecture of the Temple of Poseidon is an excellent example of classical Doric architecture, with carefully proportioned elements harmoniously organised according to highly controlled geometric proportions.

Add to Tour

Entering the Complex

Sounion, Greece

You stand inside the propylaea entryway to the sanctuary of Poseidon. This decorative gateway is believed to have been modelled off the grand entry to the acropolis of Athens. These gateways separated the realms of the sacred and the profane.

Add to Tour

In the Portico

Sounion, Greece

This viewpoint places you in the cool shade of the stoa. A stoa was a multifunctional area, with uses ranging from a sacred storehouse, to hosting shop stalls. In an area such as this, it is likely that participants in rituals would shelter here, or the space may have stored the wine, fruits, or grain used in ritual offerings.

Add to Tour

In the Porch of the Temple

Sounion, Greece

Here you stand at the entrance to the temple. In the small room before the door known as the pronaos, separated from the portico by two columns, votive offerings to the god may have been left on display, or stored temporarily before being brought into the temple.

Add to Tour

Theatre Orchestra

Corinth, Greece

The most extravagant construction in Corinth was the towering theatre, decorated with coloured marbles and statues. The Romans admired Greek theatre, and performances were staged in theatres like these, with magnificently ornamental stage buildings.

Add to Tour

Temple of Apollo

Corinth, Greece

This ancient Temple was built in the 6th century BC. It predated the invention of the Corinthian order, and was already four hundred years old by the time the Roman conquered Corinth. The Temple appears to be one of the only buildings spared by the Romans, perhaps out of reverence for Apollo.

Add to Tour

Temple E of Octavia

Corinth, Greece

This Temple is an example of the Roman’s delight in Corinthian architecture. The Romans used Greek architectural styles. How appropriate that such an excellent example of the Corinthian style is here!

Add to Tour

Roman Agora

Corinth, Greece

This agora was the social centre of the city. Here, the Romans rebuilt Greek structures, but made clear who is in charge - the space is replete with grand, imposing monuments of Roman imperial power.

Add to Tour

Lower Seating

Corinth, Greece

The lowest seating of a Roman theatre was called the ‘ima cavea’ was reserved for the wealthiest members of society and could be accessed directly from the orchestra and had the best view of the action.

Add to Tour

Upper Seating

Corinth, Greece

You stand at the uppermost seats of the theatre, the summa cavea, accessible to the least fortunate in the Graeco-Roman world. Although it is hard to see the details of the action on the stage, at least you can appreciate the ornate stage building.

Add to Tour

On the Stage

Corinth, Greece

Here you stand on the stage itself—just before the first of the audience members arrive. Behind you towers an elaborately decorated architectural fantasy, replete with gods, goddess, athletes and emperors.

Add to Tour

Arrival to Ephesus

Ephesus, Turkey

You stand aboard a corbita (Roman trading ship) approaching the cosmopolitan city of Ephesus, as it appeared in the 2nd century AD. Ephesus had a long and storied history: colonized by the Greeks and seized by the Persians before flourishing under the Roman Empire. The thriving trading centre benefited from its location within a key natural harbour until river-borne silt cut it off from the sea.

Add to Tour

Domitian’s Stadium

Palatine Hill, Italy

The private garden of the palace, the stadium of Domitian served as a lush, secluded space for the emperor. Similar in shape to a Roman circus, this was the perfect place to ruminate on the expansion of your empire, or recite love poems.

Add to Tour

Crossroads of the Forum and Palatine

Palatine Hill, Italy

This position overlooks the point where the Clivus Palatinus splits off from the Sacra Via - where the Roman Forum connects to the Palatine complex. From here can be seen a mix of sacred, secular, and regal buildings: the imperial bathhouses of the Domus Tiberiana, the Warehouses of Vespasian, and the magnificent Temple of Victorious Jupiter.

Add to Tour

Palatine Terrace

Palatine Hill, Italy

This splendidly decorated portico allowed the imperial family and entourage to survey the forum, and remains a popular tourist viewpoint today for its wide reaching vista. The construction of this multi-storied terrace was a major engineering project but when looking out, it’s clear why so much effort was put into this work.

Add to Tour

Overlooking the Circus Maximus

Palatine Hill, Italy

This portico, sadly lost today, was a prime lookout or the emperor to the circus, and also served as a place for the emperor to be seen and cheered by the plebs spectating the games. The exceptional marble panelling and flooring seen is based on examples found within the Palatine complex.

Add to Tour

Double Gates

Palatine Hill, Italy

From our current viewpoint, the balcony that was supported by the foundations you see before you is lost. In this area, the Domus Augustana was complex feat of Imperial architecture. Niches and alcoves housed triclinia (dining rooms) for hosting parties, no doubt on on race days at the Circus Maximus!

Add to Tour

Reflective pool

Palatine Hill, Italy

Although we can not venture out to see However, many visitors do not realise that behind them, stood the glorious imperial residence of the emperor. Imagine strolling from your palace to contemplate the popular contests below you. No wonder some emperors believed they were divine.

Add to Tour

Right hand doors

Palatine Hill, Italy

The sun gently sets to the west on the Domus Augustiana and brings out the lavish colours of the marble flooring, the Opus Sectile. From this vantage point, you see the Circus Maximus below and the Balneum Suae behind it. Crowded city blocks bath in the afternoon light.

Add to Tour

At the edge of the portico

Palatine Hill, Italy

The portico of the Domus Augustiana collapsed at some unknown point in the one and a half thousand years between the decline of the Western Roman Empire and the present day, but here it has been reconstructed. Leaning against the marble balustrade, the emperor would have a view down into the crowds and the racetrack of the Circus Maximus.

Add to Tour

In the Midst of the Orchestra

Paphos, Cyprus

Stand on the vibrant purple granite of the orchestra, where the theatre chorus would sing, recite, and stamp their feet. Before you are the columns of green cipollino marble. Above you on the scaena fons the imperial family looks down on the crowd, their cloaks painted in bold pastels.

Add to Tour

The Painted Paradoi

Paphos, Cyprus

From this view the lively frescoes of the paradoi can be admired. The paradoi were entryways for the performers, but this opportunity for decoration was not overlooked. The fresco colours and designs come from restorations of almost invisible traces left on the remains.

Add to Tour

Overlooking the Stage.

Paphos, Cyprus

From this position, the full scale of the theatre can be admired. The seating of this stage is estimated to facilitate up to eight and a half thousand audience members. The scaena fons followed a design common to grander Roman theatres, and proves an excellent example of Roman stagecraft.

Add to Tour

Capitoline Overview

Capitoline Hill, Italy

Here you stand on the balcony of the Aedes Deorum Consentium, the Temple of the Consenting Gods, dedicated in honour of the stability of the Olympians, perhaps as a public statement emphasizing the importance of a stable empire. The function of the rooms behind you is uncertain, but believed to house civic offices - appropriate, as these bureaucrats ensured the smooth running of Rome.

Add to Tour

Capitoline Overview North

Capitoline Hill, Italy

The Aedes Deorum Consentium was positioned at the junction connecting the forum to the Capitoline Hill. From here the forum square can be spotted through the columns of the Temple of Saturn and Temple of Vespasian. The grand triumphal arch of Septimius Severus can be seen ahead, and the arches of the Tabularium seen stretching behind the temples.

Add to Tour

Capitoline Overview North Sunset

Capitoline Hill, Italy

The Aedes Deorum Consentium was positioned at the junction connecting the forum to the Capitoline Hill. From here the forum square can be spotted through the columns of the Temple of Saturn and Temple of Vespasian. The grand triumphal arch of Septimius Severus can be seen ahead, and the arches of the Tabularium seen stretching behind the temples.

Add to Tour

In the Stands

Circus Maximus, Italy

You are seated near the temple of Sol, Roman god of the sun, who steered his chariot across the sky, hauling the sun behind him. From here you can see the curved portico of the Domus Augustiana overlooking the circus. From that splendidly decorated lookout, the emperor could see the races - and, more importantly, be seen by the people of Rome.

Add to Tour

The interior

Circus Maximus, Italy

Standing on the race track, this viewpoint demonstrates the outstanding size of the Circus Maximus. The dangerous chariot races would circle the central spina, where monuments dedicated to the victory of Rome stood triumphant. Obelisks seized from Egypt as trophies, statues of Victory, and unique sculpture works stood here for all to see.

Add to Tour

East of the Spina

Circus Maximus, Italy

Here you stand beside the metae, the turning posts of the circus where chariot racers would vie for the front spot. The many monuments of the spina stretch off into the distance down the stands, and the scale and diversity can be admired. These monuments were added progressively over time, different emperors adding their own touches to the assemblage.

Add to Tour

Close to the Spina

Circus Maximus, Italy

Before you is one of the monuments of the Circus, the mysterious Phrygian mother-goddess Cybele. According to legend, Cybele sent her spouse, Attis, mad in the Anatolian wilderness, and compelled him to castrate himself in her honour. She was brought to Rome from her sacred city, Pessinus, in the 2nd century BC and joined the family of Roman urban goddesses.

Add to Tour

In the stands (Dusk)

Circus Maximus, Italy

You are seated near the temple of Sol, Roman god of the sun, who steered his chariot across the sky, hauling the sun behind him. From here you can see the curved portico of the Domus Augustiana overlooking the circus. From that splendidly decorated lookout, the emperor could see the races - and, more importantly, be seen by the people of Rome.

Add to Tour

Close to the Spina (Dusk)

Circus Maximus, Italy

Before you is one of the monuments of the Circus, the mysterious Phrygian mother-goddess Cybele. According to legend, Cybele sent her spouse, Attis, mad in the Anatolian wilderness, and compelled him to castrate himself in her honour. She was brought to Rome from her sacred city, Pessinus, in the 2nd century BC and joined the family of Roman urban goddesses.

Add to Tour

East of the Spina (Dusk)

Circus Maximus, Italy

Description Here you stand beside the metae, the turning posts of the circus where chariot racers would vie for the front spot. The many monuments of the spina stretch off into the distance down the stands, and the scale and diversity can be admired. These monuments were added progressively over time, different emperors adding their own touches to the assemblage.

Add to Tour

Southeastern stand of Circus Maximus

Circus Maximus, Italy

The most impressive venue for games, the Circus Maximus exceeded all other Roman circuses in length, width, and capacity. Note the variety of monuments placed in course’s center and the implicit message of Rome’s dominion indicated by their presence.

Add to Tour

Temple of Diana

Evora, Portugal

Within the magnificent porticoed forum is the impressive Temple of Diana. Dedicated to the goddess of the Hunt, this temple is set atop an impressive podium and was an important venue for the religious processions that were part of daily Roman life.

Add to Tour

Roman Walls – D. Isabel Arch

Evora, Portugal

An austere Roman defensive wall constructed during the tumultuous period of the empire in the 3rd-4th century, this arch lacks the decorative capitals one might expect to finds. Composed of local granite, the arch was a main entrance to the city.

Add to Tour

Cromeleque dos Almenderes

Evora, Portugal

With menhirs dating to the 6th millennium BCE, this cromlech is one of the most important megalithic sites in Europe. The site used for religious and astronomical purposes, although various stages of development indicate no single, exclusive purpose.

Add to Tour

Roman Theatre

Lisbon, Portugal

Despite being relatively small, the theatre at Olisipo was renowned for its character and unique layout. Imagine witnessing a performance in this intimate setting, decorated with allegorical figures and an orchestra worthy of any play.

Add to Tour

Roman Galleries Rua da Prata

Lisbon, Portugal

Laden with amphorae, the gallery may be perceived as a storage unit but its true function was to support structures resting above the vaulted arches. The shoreline above rendered the earth loose, entailing a gallery for foundational support.

Add to Tour

Convento do Carmo

Lisbon, Portugal

Before you is the Convent do Carmo before the earthquake of 1755’s destructive consequences. Commissioned by D. Nuno Álvares Pereira, who helped Portugal secure independence from Castile, the convent served several civic and religious functions.

Add to Tour

Muslim Homes within St. George’s Castle

Lisbon, Portugal

Although fortifications existed on this site prior to Moorish occupation of Luxbuna, as it was known to them, it was their enhancements that formed the majority of the modern structure. Here one can see how the Moors lived medieval Lisbon.

Add to Tour

Praça do Commercio in 16th century

Lisbon, Portugal

This scene places one at the center of the commercial and political scene of 16th c. Lisbon. The market is flanked by the Paço da Ribeira, the royal palace, and was a crucial component of Lisbon’s prosperity serving as a social and economic hub.

Add to Tour

Rua Nova dos Mercadores

Lisbon, Portugal

From the commercial plaza you enter another important commercial center, the Rua Nova dos Mercadores, destroyed by the 1755 earthquake and never rebuilt to the condition before you. Notice the variegated buildings and the delicate porticoes.

Add to Tour

Rossio Square

Lisbon, Portugal

Here you are inside Rossio Square, one of the most important public spaces of the city as it existed before the 1755 earthquake. Although an important and charming space, the square was the site of many executions during the Inquisition.

Add to Tour

Praça do Commercio Before 1755

Lisbon, Portugal

Notice the difference between this commercial square before the 1755 earthquake and that of the 16th century, especially the bastion along the coast. As Lisbon flourished and grew in importance, measures had to be taken to ensure its safety.

Add to Tour

Theatre - Orchestra

Asolo, Italy

A Roman theatre with the typically superb decorative elements worthy of any performance. The levels of the cavea supported around one-thousand spectators who, during pauses in the performance, could look out the windows to the beautiful countryside.

Add to Tour

Forum Northeast

Asolo, Italy

Transporting oneself to the center of Acelum would place you in the forum standing before the elongated basilica where political matters were carried out. The forum, with its typical porticoed wings, was the social hub for the citizens of Acelum.

Add to Tour

“La Bot” Aqueduct

Asolo, Italy

Holding a lamp to light the way, you stand inside in instance of the brilliance of Roman engineering. This passage was a section of the aqueduct that carried water from its source to Acelum where it provided the water crucial for the city’s growth.

Add to Tour

Forum Northwest

Asolo, Italy

From this perspective of the forum one can take in the true dimensions of the basilica and the forum. Imagine the scene as it would be in the 2nd century, laden with politically ambitious Romans vigorously discussing the future of the city.

Add to Tour

Site Entrance

Nunney, Great Britain

This viewpoint illustrates a 14th century view of Nunney’s Castle and the surrounding town. Notice how the curtain wall separates the castle from the rest of the town and how Nunney’s Brook was used as a natural defensive implement.

Add to Tour

Rear of the keep

Nunney, Great Britain

This viewpoint places you at the rear of the keep as it was during the 14th century. Notice the proximity of the castle to the rest of the village and the Church of All Saints to the east where many important citizens of Nunney were buried.

Add to Tour

Side front

Nunney, Great Britain

Travelling in time to the 16th century, this viewpoint places you at the front of the castle with a view of the yard and of the full articulation of the curtain wall. Notice the terracing added between the moat and castle wall.

Add to Tour

In front of drawbridge

Nunney, Great Britain

Here you stand before the castle’s main entrance before the onslaught during the English Civil War. Notice the drawbridge that was later removed in favour of a normal bridge when the castle was repurposed for residential purposes.

Add to Tour

Would you like custom viewpoints?

Lithodomos VR is able to create customised viewpoints to suit your needs. Note that exclusivity may be available for custom viewpoints.

Yes please No thanks

Add custom viewpoints

Remove
Please ensure all fields are completed

Add custom viewpoint Need help with latitude and longitude?
  1. Open Google Maps
  2. Search for your location by address using the search bar at the top left of the screen.
  3. Right click on the exact viewpoint position
  4. Select "What's here?"
  5. The GPS coordinates of the point are shown in the bottom centre of the screen (latitude is the first number).

Do you need any hardware (VR headsets, mobile devices, etc)?

You can provide customers with VR tours using your own hardware, rent ours at no upfront cost or order your own branded VR headsets.

Yes please No thanks

How many headsets/phones do you need?

We recommend one headset per customer per tour.


Do you need any Cardboard viewing devices?

Cardboard viewing devices make a great upsell to your customers at the conclusion of a VR tour.

Yes please No thanks

Do you need any branded Cardboard viewing devices?

Order more than 500 and we will custom brand your business' logo onto the headsets. Your customers will leave your tour carrying a walking billboard for your business.

Minimum order quantiy 500

Order Summary


Existing viewpoints
Custom viewpoints
  • 41.890242, 12.492252
    2,000 years ago
    Midday
Hardware
  • 5 headsets
  • 500 branded cardboard viewing devices
  • 40 non-branded cardboard viewing devices
Cost summary

Lithodomos VR is priced on a per activation basis, where an activation is a single use in the Lithodomos VR app.

Submit order
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

"In less than a year, our VR tour has become one of our most popular offerings."

Nikos Sarafidis, Scooterise

"Our Museum’s virtual reality exhibit gives the visitor a unique opportunity to be transported to another place, and to change the perception of things like time and space. Lithodomos VR has been quintessential to this mission. Our visitors have loved using Lithodomos VR to relive moments and places in history, and to use these reconstructions of these ancient sites as a way to imagine themselves in the past."

Nadia Hamid, Living Computers: Museum + Labs

"Lithodomos VR's innovative work with VR technology is the future of education."

Professor Angela Ndalianis, University of Melbourne

"Lithodomos VR have been great collaborators in our research. The app of the Paphos theatre 3D model has enhanced our impact reach and has been of enormous benefit in both public outreach activities and scholarly presentation of our archaeological investigations."

Craig Barker, Director Paphos Theatre Archaeological Project

"Using Lithodomos VR’s self-guided app on-site was an amazing experience and one I would recommend to anyone. Seeing the VR reconstruction overlaid on top of the modern day ruins is unforgettable."

Al Rose

Contact Us

Lithodomos VR offers a range of products and licensing models customisable to your location and specific needs. Please connect with us via the contact form below, or email us at info@lithodomosvr.com

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
There were form errors